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Acres U.S.A. Bestseller List — January 2017

Here were the top sellers between Jan. 1, 2017 and Jan. 31, 2017, from the Acres U.S.A. bookstore.

restoration_agriculture_awardseal

1. Restoration Agriculture

By Mark Shepard

$30.00

Restoration Agriculture explains how we can have all of the benefits of natural, perennial ecosystems and create agricultural systems that imitate nature in form and function while still providing for our food, building, fuel and many other needs — in your own backyard, farm or ranch.

Copyright 2013, softcover, 339 pages

Buy It: http://www.acresusa.com/restoration-agriculture

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Eco-Alternative Farmsteading

Emily and Brian Towneby JILL HENDERSON

Russellville, Missouri is beautifully situated on the line that separates the rugged Ozark Mountains from the rolling prairies of the Midwest. This small town has a quaint charm that blends well with the dramatic rolling hills and rural farms that dot the landscape. It’s also a convenient 15 miles to the bustling state capital, Jefferson City.

Living smack dab in the middle of this classic slice of Americana are Emily and Brian Towne, self-described “eco-alternative farmsteaders” striving to produce the bulk of their own meat, dairy, eggs, produce and non-GMO animal feed, while building a fledgling retail business selling and bartering eggs, chicken, milk, produce, garlic and herbs to a small but growing consumer base.

The Townes love the country life —it’s in their blood. Emily grew up on a rocky Ozark hill farm and Brian was raised on a traditional row crop farm in Iowa. Yet, like so many farm kids, Brian and Emily set out into the world after high school to get an education and to find out if there was something else out there for them besides farming. When the couple met in Omaha, Nebraska, in the early ’90s, Emily was working for a Fortune 500 company and Brian worked as a mechanic. Soon after they were married, the couple moved back to Brian’s family farm where they grew corn, soy and a variety of livestock. Three years later, the couple moved to Columbia, Missouri, with the hopes of starting a farm of their own one day.

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Interview: Researcher, Writer Jim Thomas Discusses Suite of Emerging Synthetic Biology Technologies

jim thomas headshotCulture of Disruption

Interviewed by Tracy Frisch

For 20 years, Jim Thomas has been at the forefront of international policy debates and campaigns on emerging technologies with Greenpeace International and ETC Group. Steward Brand called him “the leading critic of biotech.” As a strategist and organizer working with civil society partners, Thomas has repeatedly led successful international campaigns of global importance. In the late 1990s he was one of less than a dozen leaders of a high-profile national movement to prevent the introduction of GM food and crops into the United Kingdom market. He played a major role in achieving and strengthening the United Nations moratoria on geoengineering, ocean fertilization and Terminator seeds. He also helped secure the first global UN agreement on Synthetic Biology and halt geoengineering projects in Ecuador, Philippines, UK, the United States and Canadian/Haida territory. Thomas is co-author of numerous ETC Group reports and his writing has been published in many media outlets including The Guardian, The Times UK, Slate, Huffington Post, The Ecologist, New Internationalist and RSA
Journal. He has been a featured speaker around the world for audiences as diverse as La Via Campesina (peasant movements) and grassroots activists to government ministers and CEOs. He has appeared in 10 documentary films. Thomas was born in Zambia, grew up in the UK, worked on several continents and now lives near Montreal, Canada.

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Harnessing the Power of Clay

by JAMES C. SILVERTHORNE

One of my horses, an 8-yeaphoto1r-old mare, came in from the pasture walking with a distinct limp. I found that she had a horizontal cut (three-eighths of an inch deep by 1¾ inches long) on the fleshy back of her left foreleg’s pastern, just above the bulbs of the heel. An equine veterinarian inspected the wound and advised me that healing would be slow due to the wound site’s new tissue being flexed with each step. He also assured me that after healing, the previously able animal would always be lame from scar tissue forming too close to a tendon.

Swelling soon occurred on the leg from the wound up to the knee joint. Periodically, I support-wrapped the leg from fetlock (joint just above pastern) up to the knee with elastic banding cloth. The cut began to heal with applications of a comfrey gel, but after a week the new tissue cracked open because of November’s change to colder, drier air. Healing stopped. Later, I realized that applications of a moisturizing salve had been needed.

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Industrial Organics Competition

salatin-industrial_photo1by JOEL SALATIN

“Wal-Mart is the largest vendor of organic products.” This headline began appearing in news outlets about five years ago and announced a major change in the integrity food game. Hailed by some as a major positive breakthrough, others, like me, see it as a new threat to the ecological farming movement.

In a recent farm tour, I surprised myself by saying to the assembled group: “industrial organics is now just as big a liability in our food system as Monsanto.” The statement came on the heels of questions regarding why our farm was not certified organic or any of the other certifications currently lauded as third-party verifications for animal welfare, fair trade, or Good Agricultural Practices (GAP).

At the outset of the organic certification movement, I remember suggesting that what we really needed to certify was the reading material next to the farmer’s toilet. All of us involved in the fledgling clean food protocols realized that this was more of an idea, a lifestyle, a worldview, than it was a list of dos and don’ts. And yet the do and don’t list is exactly where the idea went with the passage of the National Organic Standards.

Although it took awhile for the federal government’s ownership of the word organic to sprout legs in the food and farm culture, it certainly did …big legs. In the past five years, I’ve sensed a major shift in the organic market that does not bode well for the local integrity food movement built on neighbor trust and transparency.

Recent shenanigans from the National Organic Standards Board (NOSB), from stacking oversight toward industry representatives in defiance of the enabling legislation’s clear intent, to eliminating the mandatory sunset clause for questionable substances indicate a profound adulteration of the organic idea. Constant litigation and exposure by the watchdog outfit Cornucopia, as wonderful as it is, seems to do little to arrest the juggernaut of adulteration within the industrial organic fraternity.

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Make the Most of the 2016 Acres U.S.A. Conference

Omaha, Nebraska
Eco-Ag U: Tuesday, Nov. 29-Wednesday, Nov. 30
Main Conference: Wednesday, Nov. 30-Friday, Dec. 2

Be an Acres Conference All-Star:
Catch a flick: We work hard to bring exciting, informative films to each conference for your viewing pleasure. The films are shown around lunchtime, so check the conference schedule and don’t miss out. This year’s selections include: Seed: The Untold Story and Circle of Poison.
Meet the Author! We hold numerous book signings throughout the conference. Check the schedule, buy the books in our on-site bookstore, meet the author and get your copy signed.
Get your questions answered in Consulting Halls: Meet with top eco-ag consultants in a small-group setting…a rare opportunity to obtain valuable advice specific to your farm’s needs.
Trade Show: Don’t forget to visit the more than 100 vendors of high-quality eco-inputs and innovations in our Trade Show. Whether you are looking for a specific product or want to pick someone’s brain, the trade show delivers.
Nutritious eats: No need to leave the hotel in search of quality food (although there are lots of great options in Omaha…we’ll highlight a few later) with Creative Cuisine Catering.
Continued learning: Each conference keynote speech and all lecture sessions are recorded live. The recordings are available during the conference as they are produced and full sets of CDs and MP3s are available after the conference.
On-Site Bookstore: Take advantage of excellent prices on all our titles…without worrying about shipping!
Top-Tier Keynoters: Treat yourself to a mind-expanding session each evening at 7:30 p.m. including organic pioneer and author Grace Gershuny, health authority and author Dr. Arden Andersen and farmer and activist Denise O’Brien.

What to bring:
Pens/Notepad/Notebook (You’ll want to take lots of notes. It also helps to write your name on your notebook in case it gets left behind in a session.)
Business/Contact Cards (You will be meeting people with the same farm interests/business needs and ideas — take advantage!)
Reusable Water Bottle (The warm air can be pretty dry indoors in the wintertime.)
Backpack (Many folks find this useful to help bring their supplies, especially if they are leaving and coming back to the hotel throughout the day.)
Badge (When you check in, you’ll receive a name badge. Please don’t misplace your badge, and remember to wear it each day as you’ll need to display it for admission to all conference events and the trade show.)
Conference Program (When you check in, we’ll give you a nifty tote bag designed for this year’s meeting. Inside the bag will be helpful resources including a full conference program including the list of events, times and locations as well as information about the speakers, a map of the Trade Show with information about each vendor and more. Keep it handy!)
Comfortable Shoes (Trust us on this one.)

Venue:
Hilton Omaha, 1001 Cass Street, Omaha, Nebraska 68102, phone: 402-998-3400.

Getting to the hotel:
Airport Transportation, by Taxi
One-way fare between the Omaha Airport and downtown is about $11. Upon arrival at the airport, proceed to ground transportation by the baggage claim. There should be cabs waiting. Following are the taxi companies in Omaha:
• Happy Cab ─ 402-333-TAXI (8294)
• Checker Cab ─ 402-333-TAXI (8294)
• Yellow Cab ─ 402-333-TAXI (8294)
• Safeway Cab ─ 402-333-TAXI (8294)
• City Taxi ─ 402-933-8700

Driving from the Airport
From airport, take left onto Abbott Drive. Left at 10th Street, to Cass Street. Turn right. Hotel is on the left.

Parking:
Self parking: $14.00 (Garage Parking)
Valet: $20.00 (Event Valet: $15)

Dining in Omaha
Here are a few recommendations:
Block 16: block16omaha.com
Avoli Osteria: avoliosteria.com
The Grey Plume: thegreyplume.com
Kitchen Table: kitchentableomaha.com
The Blackstone Meatball: theblackstonemeatball.com
LOCAL Beer, Patio and Kitchen Old Market: localbeer.co
Lot 2: lot2benson.com
Modern Love: modernloveomaha.com
V. Mertz: vmertz.com

Want more information? Check out our Conference FAQs: www.acresusa.com/2016conference-faq