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Archive | February, 2016

Joel Salatin: Communicating Ecological Eating

This article first appeared in the February 2016 issue of Acres U.S.A.

Six Key Messages for Consumer Outreach


by Joel Salatin

Joel Salatin believes ecological farmers must constantly teach consumers ecological eating.As farmers, we enjoy conversations about soil, water, animal husbandry, horticulture and every other kind of production nuance. That’s as it should be. But all of this production is meaningless without someone to use it.

Obviously the industrial food system has a lot of users. Whether those users are lazy, ignorant, evil or just plain unconscious is anybody’s guess. But if we’re ever going to get ecological farming more widely practiced, we obviously need more ecological eaters.

How do we move ecological farming forward fastest? Is it by converting farmers, or converting people who buy our stuff? Certainly both need attention, but I’ll submit that we don’t put enough responsibility on customers. While we farmers shoulder the brunt of accusations regarding depleted soils, tasteless food, animal abuse and pathogen-laden fare, by and large consumers escape with excuses. Continue Reading →

Urban Bee Environments Boost Pathogen Pressure

bee flowerResearchers from North Carolina State University have found that urban environments increase pathogen abundance in honeybees and reduce honeybee survival. The research team found that colonies closer to urban areas and those managed by beekeepers had higher pathogen pressure. “Overall, we found that the probability of worker [bee] survival in laboratory experiments declined threefold in bees collected from urban environments, as compared to those collected in rural environments,” says associate professor of entomology Steve Frank. However, the researchers also found that immune response was not affected by urbanization. Because immune response was the same across environments, researchers think the higher pathogen pressure in urban areas may be due to increased rates of transmission, which could be because bee colonies have fewer feeding sites to choose from in urban areas, so they are interacting with more bees from other colonies.

This article appears in the February 2016 issue of Acres U.S.A.