Archive | July, 2016

Interview: Fungi Guru Tradd Cotter Talks Mycoremediation, Mushroom Farming and Developing Research

Wild World of Mycology

Interviewed by Tracy Frisch

image001 (21)The field of mycology represents a  critical next frontier in biology. Relative to the plant and animal kingdoms, mushrooms have been largely neglected by science and yet they hold enormous promise for healing people and the planet, if you believe Tradd Cotter and others in his tribe. Fungi offer tremendously important applications in many realms of material life, from agriculture to medicine, from environmental cleanup to manufacturing and waste management.
Cotter calls it mycotopia.

In the new generation of passionate mycologists, Cotter stands out as a brilliant leader and restless innovator. He is a keen observer of and experimenter with all things mycological, an inveterate inventor who combines intuition and careful study with a wildly creative streak and is a much-in-demand lecturer who entertains and motivates while he educates. His first book, Organic Mushroom Farming and Mycoremediation has garnered outstanding reviews.

Cotter is a microbiologist, professional mycologist and organic gardener who has been tissue culturing, collecting native fungi in the Southeast and cultivating fungi both commercially and experimentally for more than 22 years. In 1996 he founded Mushroom Mountain, which he owns and operates with his wife, Olga. The company, his platform for exploring applications for mushrooms in various industries, currently maintains more than 200 species of fungi for food production, mycoremediation of environmental pollutants and natural alternatives to chemical pesticides. He’s particularly fond of coming up with low-tech and no-tech cultivation strategies so that anyone can grow mushrooms on just about anything, anywhere in the world. Mushroom Mountain is expanding to 42,000 square feet of laboratory and research space near Greenville, South Carolina, to accommodate commercial production, as well as mycoremediation projects. Tradd, Olga and their daughter, Heidi, live in Liberty, South Carolina, in the northwestern part of the state.

Continue Reading →