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Archive | Disease

Gut Microbiota Linked to Autism

autism-spectrum-disorderChildren with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have significantly different concentrations of certain bacterial-produced chemicals, called metabolites, in their feces compared to children without ASD. “Most gut bacteria are beneficial, aiding food digestion, producing vitamins, and protecting against harmful bacteria. If left unchecked, however, harmful bacteria can excrete dangerous metabolites or disturb a balance in metabolites that can affect the gut and the rest of the body, including the brain,” said Dae-Wook Kang of the Biodesign Institute of Arizona State University. Increasing evidence suggests that children with ASD have altered gut bacteria. In order to identify possible microbial metabolites associated with ASD, Kang and his colleagues looked for and compared the compounds in fecal samples from children with and without ASD. They found that children with ASD had significantly different concentrations of seven of the 50 compounds they identified.

This article appears in the July 2014 issue of Acres U.S.A.

Commercial Organic Grafted Tomato Production

TomatoCommercial organic tomato production is lucrative but challenging. Marketable fruit can bring a good price but yield is reduced by crop disease and insect pressure, drought and flooding, non-optimal nutrient supplies and other factors. Grafted tomato plants can be less susceptible to some of these stresses, particularly certain nematodes and soilborne diseases. There is also evidence that grafted tomato plants tolerate unwanted extremes in soil moisture, low soil fertility and high soil salinity levels more effectively than ungrafted plants.

Grafting creates a direct, physical and one-time ‘hybrid’ plant with traits of the rootstock and scion varieties it contains. Rootstock and scion variety selection is the first step in using grafted tomato plants and the selection should be done very carefully based on traits that are important to you on your farm. Learn more about how thousands of combinations affect production outcomes and what Ohio State University is researching in the January 2014 issue of Acres U.S.A.

Pigs on Probiotics

Probiotics may help fight antimicrobial resistance.

Piglets fed probiotic Enterococcus faecium showed reduced numbers of potentially pathogenic Escherichia coli strains in their intestines, according to a team of German researchers. The research is important, because in 2006 the European Union prohibited the feeding of antibiotics to livestock as growth promoters. Therefore, the research team sought to investigate whether probiotics could substitute for antibiotics, by reducing pathogen populations in the intestines, says Carmen Bednorz of Freie Universitat Berlin, Germany. The study was published in the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology. Antimicrobials are thought to promote growth in industrially grown livestock because without them, the rationale goes, in such close quarters, a surfeit of pathogens would slow growth. “Our data suggest that the feeding of probiotics could substitute for antimicrobials as growth promoters,” says Bednorz. “This could help to reduce the burden of antimicrobial resistance.

This article appears in the January 2014 issue of Acres U.S.A.

Blood Calcium in Dairy Cows

 

Photo by USDA NRCS

Photo by USDA NRCS

The health of dairy cows after giving birth is a major factor in the quantity and quality of the milk the cows produce. Researchers at the University of Missouri have found that subclinical hypocalcemia, which is the condition of having low levels of calcium in the blood and occurs in many cows after giving birth, is related to higher levels of fat in the liver. John Middleton, a professor in the MU College of Veterinary Medicine, says these higher levels of fat are often precursors to future health problems in cows. “We found that about 50 percent of dairy cows suffered subclinical hypocalcemia and subsequent higher levels of fat in the liver after giving birth to their calves,” Middleton said. “These higher levels of fat in the liver are often tied to health problems in dairy cows, including increased risk for uterus and mammary infections as well as ketosis, which is a condition that results in the cows expending more energy than they are taking in through their diet. All of these conditions can decrease the amount of milk these dairy cows will produce.”

This article appears in the January 2014 issue of Acres U.S.A.