AcresUSA.com links

Archive | Eco-Farming

How to Manage Available Phosphorus

canstockphoto26719966When trying to manage available phosphorous, here’s a question that you may not realize is related: Have you ever baked a cake? If you want the cake to turn out well you need to have the right amounts and ratios of ingredients. What would happen if you decided to modify the cake recipe and double the liquids, while cutting the flour and dry ingredients in half? It would mix just fine in a bowl, but when you take it out of the oven you would have some glop that nobody wants to eat, and you wouldn’t dare call it a cake. You must understand the right proportions to make modifications, or else you need to follow a recipe.

In this same way, in order to manage available phosphorus correctly, you need to maintain the right levels available nutrients in soil if you want to produce nutrient-dense foods. It is especially important to keep your eye on the big three: calcium, phosphorus and potassium. If you get these three right in your soil, everything else is a piece of cake.

Continue Reading →

Interview: Biointensive method continues to help farmers reap ultra-productive harvests, boost soil health

John-JeavonsStill Growing Strong

John Jeavons is known around the world as the leading exponent of the small-scale, sustainable agricultural method he has trademarked as Grow Biointensive. Working from the heart of Mendocino County, California, he is a tireless advocate, developer and researcher of intensive growing. Over the years he has proven that the title of his best-known book, How to Grow More Vegetables, Fruits, Nuts, Berries, Grains, and Other Crops Than You Ever Thought Possible On Less Land Than You Can Imagine, is no exaggeration. As he tells below, Jeavons has been hard at it for over 40 years, yet he still talks about his work with unabashed enthusiasm and passion.
— Chris Walters

Continue Reading →

Grow Berries on a Suburban Farm

Photo1

Ripening ‘Red Lake’ red currants.

Ever wonder how to grow berries on a suburban farm?

Growing up in central New Jersey, I’ve seen large expanses of former farmland transformed into seemingly endless residential sprawl. While this doesn’t bode well for open space (as well as a host of other things), it does present opportunity for those able to attract these new potential customers. One way is by creating a suburban farm. Such a farm, on less than an acre, allows spry and innovative farmers to use small size and proximity to markets to their advantage.

Eight years ago, after my youngest child neared the end of high school, I decided to expand my love of gardening into a business. I started off small — about a tenth of an acre in part of my backyard. I named my suburban farm “Pitspone Farm” — from a Hebrew word meaning very small. Over the years I slowly expanded, until at this point I’ve more or less taken over my entire backyard, about one-third of an acre.

From time to time customers come to my farm to pick up produce or visit my operation. Invariably I’ll get a call as they sit in their car in front of my house: “Hi, I’m not sure we’re in the right place. This looks like a residential area.” At that point I usually come out from the back to greet and reassure them that they are indeed in the right place. From the front my home looks like a typical residence. All the action is in the back.

My goal has been, and continues to be, to explore the model of a small-scale suburban farm, both as an income producing entity and as a contributor to the food supply. This model for growing berries might be of interest to people in several types of circumstances:
1. Not everyone is lucky enough to find large, affordable acreages for farming. However, many of us living in the suburbs have easy access to enough land for a suburban farm.
2. A suburban farm can be a useful way to transition into larger acreage, by establishing markets and experimenting with various crops.
3. A small suburban farm allows one to work a farm while holding down an additional job.

Continue Reading →

Interview: Fungi Guru Tradd Cotter Talks Mycoremediation, Mushroom Farming and Developing Research

Wild World of Mycology

Interviewed by Tracy Frisch

image001 (21)The field of mycology represents a  critical next frontier in biology. Relative to the plant and animal kingdoms, mushrooms have been largely neglected by science and yet they hold enormous promise for healing people and the planet, if you believe Tradd Cotter and others in his tribe. Fungi offer tremendously important applications in many realms of material life, from agriculture to medicine, from environmental cleanup to manufacturing and waste management.
Cotter calls it mycotopia.

In the new generation of passionate mycologists, Cotter stands out as a brilliant leader and restless innovator. He is a keen observer of and experimenter with all things mycological, an inveterate inventor who combines intuition and careful study with a wildly creative streak and is a much-in-demand lecturer who entertains and motivates while he educates. His first book, Organic Mushroom Farming and Mycoremediation has garnered outstanding reviews.

Cotter is a microbiologist, professional mycologist and organic gardener who has been tissue culturing, collecting native fungi in the Southeast and cultivating fungi both commercially and experimentally for more than 22 years. In 1996 he founded Mushroom Mountain, which he owns and operates with his wife, Olga. The company, his platform for exploring applications for mushrooms in various industries, currently maintains more than 200 species of fungi for food production, mycoremediation of environmental pollutants and natural alternatives to chemical pesticides. He’s particularly fond of coming up with low-tech and no-tech cultivation strategies so that anyone can grow mushrooms on just about anything, anywhere in the world. Mushroom Mountain is expanding to 42,000 square feet of laboratory and research space near Greenville, South Carolina, to accommodate commercial production, as well as mycoremediation projects. Tradd, Olga and their daughter, Heidi, live in Liberty, South Carolina, in the northwestern part of the state.

Continue Reading →

Interview: Author, Advocate Courtney White Unites Groups at Odds through Regenerative Agriculture

Courtney-WhiteFinding Common Ground

“Courtney, the Berlin Wall fell down up here.” These were the words of a Forest Service District Ranger back in 1998. He was talking about the wall between ranchers and environmentalists in the region, and people passing out the hammers and helping with the teardown were, and still are, called the Quivira Coalition. Courtney White, the subject of this month’s interview, co-founded Quivira in 1997 because he was dismayed and disheartened by the nasty, unceasing legal and ideological dogfighting over the disposition of Western lands. He thought it might be a good idea, for example, if environmentalists heard from scientists about the importance of fire to restoring grass. Or if ranchers and farmers heard from a peer about the advantages of moving livestock around, and heard it while conservationists and environmentalists were in the room. As the ranger indicated, the simple idea of bringing people together to relax the grip around each other’s throats and learn a few things, turned out to be terrifically well-timed and apt. After 17 years as director of Quivira, White decided to concentrate full-time on writing books, of which the eminently useful Two Percent Solutions for the Planet is only the latest example. Reached at home in Santa Fe, he graciously agreed to reflect on the past two decades of building coalitions and opening eyes.

Continue Reading →

Book review: Resilient Agriculture: Cultivating Food Systems for a Changing Climate

by Laura Lengnick, book review by Chris Walters

resilient-agricultureThis is not a book composed of brisk summaries and sweeping statements. Laura Lengnick gets into the weeds without delay, devoting the first 100-odd pages to laying out the particulars of sensitivity and adaptability that affect farms buffeted by rapid changes in weather patterns. Given the size and complexity of the phenomena under discussion — as well as masses of fresh data being collected all the time — it’s something like a thumbnail sketch. But it’s an impressively detailed, lucid and well-organized introduction to a topic that could easily fill several volumes.

Lengnick asks the crucial question in the final paragraph of her book’s first third: “What are the barriers and opportunities to the development of a sustainable U.S. agriculture robust to the increasing pace and intensity of climate change?” The rest of the book is devoted to the answer as delivered by 25 sustainable producers from all over the land. Every region is represented, and readers are likely to encounter people they’ve already met either at conferences or in these pages. All of them sound like people you’d like to meet, and taken as a whole, the range of their responses to the bedevilments of the past few years are dazzling. Continue Reading →