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Archive | Eco-Philosophy

Falcons for Bird Abatement

Falcons are a predator of feathered farmyard dwellers, but they can be put to positive use on the farm. When it comes to employing creative solutions for naturally protecting crops on organic farms, perhaps the sky really is the limit. Duncan Family Farms, an organic grower located in Goodyear, Arizona, specializing in baby greens, kale, beets, chard and herbs is using an innovative method for bird abatement: falconry.

A falcon takes flight at Duncan Family Farms.

Duncan Family Farms has been working with Falcon Force since fall of 2016, according to Specialty Crop Manager Patty Emmert. Falcon Force has been practicing nuisance bird abatement for six years and operates in five states. Their clients include farms, orchards, vineyards, resorts and airports. Falcon Force uses the predator/prey relationship to eliminate pest birds, which can cause millions of dollars in damages. Falcon Force uses a team of trained falcons to intimidate and scare off nuisance birds such as the horned larks and pigeons that frequent the area. Continue Reading →

Organic Agriculture Can Feed the World

Organic agriculture practices are often blamed for being unsustainable and not able to feed the world. In fact, several high-profile advocates of conventional agricultural production have stated that the world would starve if

A worker in the agricultural field.

we all converted to organic agriculture. They have written articles for science journals and other publications saying that organic agriculture is not sustainable and produces yields that are significantly lower than conventional agriculture.

Thus, the push for genetically modified organisms, growth hormones, animal- feed antibiotics, food irradiation and toxic synthetic chemicals is being justified, in part, by the rationale that without these products the world will not be able to feed itself.

Continue Reading →

Industrial Agriculture Versus Biological Agriculture: An Ethical Debate

Industrial agriculture and biological agriculture differ on one very fundamental point: ethics.

A free-range pig.

Sometimes it behooves us all to step back and look at the foundations of our own paradigm in order to give us a greater conviction in its defense. The philosophical underpinnings of our views are often easier to defend than specific details.

For example, I have debated agri-industrial darling Dennis Avery, author of Saving the Planet with Pesticides and Plastic, three times in public forums, and he is no dummy. A retired USDA big-wheel economist, a Ph.D. and spokesman for everything genetically engineered. irradiated or confinement reared, he is articulate and likable.

Continue Reading →

Tractor Time Podcast Episode 3: Charles Walters and ‘A Return to Intellectualism’

Charles Walters in his Acres U.S.A. office.

Charles Walters in his Acres U.S.A. office.

As Charles Walters, founder of Acres U.S.A., said in his talk that will follow, if he had asked his father in 1945: “Are you an organic farmer, he would have said “What’s that?” In less than a century, we’ve come far enough to forget how we have farmed for centuries. And how new the introduction of industrial pesticides and herbicides is for farming, and how little we truly know about the massive effect it’s had on our health, on our environment and on our food supply.

Anyway, in the talk that will follow, Charles Walters spoke to this point with the help of Lee Fryer, and a few farmers in the audience. He will tell you that even today, the effort to, as he put it, “to liberate the organic farmers,” goes on. With truth on our side. That the challenge now is to return the burden of proof to the conventional agriculture systems, to those who want to coat our foods with poison, to prove that it is as safe as organic farming, and not the other way around.

Introduction by Ryan Slabaugh.

Listen to and download the first three episodes here.

Tractor Time Podcast Episode 2: Reginaldo Haslett-Marroquin

Regi-Grey-MSP-Portrait-2016-1On this week’s Tractor Time podcast, we interviewed author and regenerative agriculture guru Reginaldo Haslett-Marroquin. His story is not only inspirational, but transcends genres.

His book, “In the Shadow of Green Man,” documents this. It speaks to growing up in poverty, through civil war, learning from his father, moving to Minnesota, graduating from school and leading an organization focused on regenerative models of agriculture.

“Knowledge without wisdom is a more dangerous weapon than the most dangerous weapons we use in wars,” Haslett-Marroquin said in the podcast. “Why? They are the silent killers.”

You can learn more about his work by ordering his book, or by visiting www.mainstreetproject.org. A video is below that also documents their work.

Tractor Time is a weekly podcast from Acres U.S.A., the voice of Eco-Agriculture. Listen to Episode 1, featuring Abbey Smith with The Savory Institute and an archival talk from Charles Walters, here.

Acres U.S.A. Podcast Episode 1: Abbey Smith and Charles Walters

Abbey Smith, global network coordinator for the Savory Institute.

Abbey Smith, global network coordinator for the Savory Institute.

 

In Episode 1, we interview Abbey Smith with the Savory Institute and ask her about her life as a teacher, rancher and world traveler. She’s spent years studying and practicing holistic grazing methods, and is trying to help the Savory Institute reach their goals of creating and protecting 1 billion hectares of sustainable grazing land around the world.

Then, we turn back the clock and present a talk from Acres U.S.A. founder Charles Walters. He details the challenges facing eco-farmers, which is still applicable today, and how those challenges increase in the face of the popularity of conventional farming.

Enjoy. If you have feedback or ideas, please email us at podcast@acresusa.com.