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From Coffee Grounds to Gourmet Mushrooms

oyster mushroom

Kansas State University researchers are taking used coffee grounds from a campus coffee shop and using them as compost to cultivate gourmet mushrooms at the K-State Student Farm. By composting alone, 50 pounds a week — or about 30 percent of the coffee shop’s total waste — has been diverted from landfills. “The goal of the project is to demonstrate our potential at Kansas State University to initiate a successful closed-loop recycling and composting program that diverts waste from landfills and produce a beneficial product,” Natalie Mladenov, assistant professor of civil engineering said. While developing the compost program, the researchers made an important discovery: coffee grounds make excellent compost for cultivating mushrooms, particularly gourmet mushrooms, such as oyster, shiitake and reishi. The United States gets nearly 45 percent of its mushrooms from China, and there is a need for more local suppliers of gourmet mushrooms, said Kaley Oldani, student leader for the project.

This article appears in the September 2014 issue of Acres U.S.A.

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